Don’t Let Abrasives be the Root Cause of a Shutdown

Avoid disruptions to rehabilitation / construction projects that are associated with surface preparation and the dusty conditions associated with ordinary blasting. Protect sensitive equipment normally effected by blasting operations. For example:

  • Motors
  • Mechanical seals
  • Compressors
  • Rotating equipment and bearings
  • Hydraulic and pneumatic cylinders
  • Exchangers

Sponge blasting reduces dust and abrasive ricochet, which allow project managers to consolidate and schedule other trades to work in close proximity; tasks normally delayed can now be accomplished simultaneously by Sponge Blasting – to shorten project schedules and reduce the high costs of downtime.


Testimonials

"This technology protects the integrity of both equipment and personnel; it does not produce residue that causes contamination in the job area or fine particulate.... generally associated with clogging and several other failures along the lines (e.g. the pumping and compressor systems)." - EcoPetrol S.A.


Related Resources

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  • EcoPetrol Safety Bulletin

    PDF case history document created by Ecopetrol, Colombia’s principal petroleum company, describing…

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