Preserve History – Protect What’s Important

Sponge-Jet provides professionals with a dry, low-dust, micro-abrasive composite to clean multiple substrates across many applications.

  • Removal of environmental contaminants
  • Historic structures & monument rehabilitation
  • Graffiti removal
  • Lead paint remediation
  • Efflorescence & exfoliation
  • Soot, char & smoke damage
  • Stone & marble cleaning

Materials can be selected that can remove contaminants without damaging the surface. This controllable system allows the operator to adjust pressures and media rates to match the needs of the project. The low rebound nature of Sponge Media prevents damage to adjacent surfaces, while the low dust feature enables the operator to visually watch and control contaminant removal during the process.


Testimonials

“In terms of preservation, graffiti is among the bigger problems we face on the wall because it’s fragile sandstone. In the past, we’ve had to use chemicals… Now, we have available gentle abrasive measures.” - Senior Preservation Conservator, Presidio Trust


Related Resources

  • Battery Chamberlin Preservation

    Article on historic US Army gun at Battery Chamberlin (California) and how Sponge-Jet was selected b…

    Download
  • Cleaning Wisconsin State Capitol

    PDF magazine article describes how Sponge-Jet blast media was used to clean, exfoliate, and preserve…

    Download
  • Courthouse Restoration Article Traditional Building

    PDF magazine article describes using Sponge-Jet blast media to remove multiple layers of decades-old…

    Download
  • Overview of Historic Restoration

    DF document showcases Sponge-Jet’s ability to precisely clean sensitive and ultrasensitive surface…

    Download

Recent Blog Posts

  • Why Pre and Post Project Surveys are Critical for Lead Jobs

    Imagine for a moment that ACME Coatings Contractor has recently completed an important water tank exterior coatings project. The job, which involved removing lead-based paint from the 40 meter (135-ft) tall, 3.7-million liter, legged tank, went well from start to finish. The owners are happy, final payment has been rendered, and the project manager is filing the last bit of paperwork when the owner’s representative calls and asks, “Out of curiosity, how can we be sure that ACME didn’t leave lead dust under or around the tank?”

    Read More >
  • Abrasive Nozzles: A Short History

    B. C. Tilghman: The Father of Sandblasting and Abrasive Nozzles

    The process of sandblasting as we know it today started around 1870 with a man named Benjamin Chew Tilghman, who observed abrasive wear on wind-blown desert windows. Tilghman also noticed the effect that high-velocity sand could have on hard material and began designing a machine that could propel sand at speeds much faster than the wind - and could concentrate this flow into a small stream.

    Read More >
More Posts